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About Us

Our Staff

Angelica Santiago
Executive Director
Angel Boria
Fiscal Officer
Stephanie Marquez
Case Manager
Zugely Ortiz
Financial Coach
Joan Pardo
Youth Development Coordinator/POSSE Coach
Luis Santiago
MIS, Technician
Jocelyn Roman
Case Manager
Marisol Casiano
Case Manager

Board Members

Miguel Arriaga
President
Gabriel Camacho
Vice President
Hilda Sorell
Treasurer
Cruzita Crespo
Member

Our History

Puerto Rican Unity for Progress
PRUP 1975 – 1976

425 BroadwayView of 425 Broadway, looking from Broadway Street. This structure has a curious 3 facade opening in the second floor; the windows are box style reminiscence of early Colonial flush frame 6×6 structural woodwork. The decorative soldier courses above the window and the handsome brick brackets remain in good condition. The original cornice is Colonial in design, but may have been replaced with 19th Century tin mold. The first floor has been altered for commercial purposes, but the architecturally correct eave over the first floor remains in its original pre industrial form. The charm and the detail make this structure a candidate for restoration…Sympathetic of course.

423 BroadwayView of 423 Broadway, looking from Broadway Street. This structure has been fire damaged and has been altered by deterioration. The original roof line with the Colonial dormer is no longer there. The cornice is missing and the first floor has been bastardized by incompatible uses of the structure.
The window frames are box types and still structurally sound, the double window openings are curious, but every indication shows that this is the original design. The structure offers an opportunity for complete restoration or rehabilitation for whatever proposes. However, together with 425 and 427, it forms a continuous row of diverse architectural elements representative of Colonial Camden. Under the Federal preservation laws, these structures should be Historically Certified and restored to their early colonial charm.

427-425-423 BroadwayView of 427-425-423 Broadway, looking South from Broadway. The three buildings are representative of the diverse form the style of the early Colonial and the Greek Revival periods. The variation in heights and fenestration can still be appreciated. The buildings are structurally sound and presently two are occupied. The structures are representative of the Architecture found in the City of Camden, which dates back to the 19th Century.

427-425-423 BroadwayView of 427-425-423 Broadway, looking North from Broadway. The scale of the three buildings is relatively small and humble and more conductive to personalize services than manufacturing features found in large structures. The taller structure to the right is presently abandoned and unoccupied. The lower building beyond is a striving medical clinic.

427 from BroadwayView of 427 from Broadway. The structure still sports the original cornice and accompanying brick brackets. The butter joint brick-work is accentuated with the Revival lintels over the windows openings. 6×6 lights are proper. The eave below the windows has been removed and replaced by signage. The 1st. floor façade has experienced various intensive changes to conform to usage; the basic structure however, remains in sound condition. This structure is an unusual 24’ in width and is presently the headquarters of the Puerto Rican Unity for Progress Organization which services the Hispanic community in the City of Camden.
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Puerto Rican Unity for Progress (PRUP) was incorporated in 1976 as a non-profit entity targeting its services to the 14,231 Hispanic residents of Camden, at the time. According to the 2000 U.S. Census Bureau, this population has increased to over 31,000. Several service contracts with the City, County, State, and Federal government have been implemented since. A comprehensive approach to the development of the targeted community was initiated. This approach includes the coordination of services and resources among various Hispanic service providers, as well as, networking efforts with all the service providers in the area. PRUP is the only multi-service agency serving Hispanics of all ages and genders in our area. Although this population represents about 7% of the total Camden County City’s population, Hispanics are known to compose at least 38% of the Camden City’s population. One indicator of the size of the Hispanic segment is the education system, where 35% of the students are of Hispanic origin.

The fundamental objective of PRUP is to promote the overall advancement of the Hispanic community. The Hispanic sector of the population experiences ethological differences, which in most instances impair effective communication with traditional service structures. PRUP is a center where this population is assisted in procuring the services available within a given community, in a direct or indirect manner. We have addressed the most pressing needs, which are identified as employment, economic for youth intervention, violence and substance abuse prevention as well as, the needs for education/ training for the adult population.

Past Programs at PRUP

Many programs have been offered since PRUP’s inception. These include: Case Management, Literacy, Job Readiness, English as a Second Language (ESL), Graduate Equivalency Diploma (GED) preparation, Computer Training for adults, as well as, youth services to include Youth Computer Literacy, Youth Work Readiness, educational/cultural projects to address school absenteeism, Peacemaker Project, Youth Violence Prevention and Substance Abuse Prevention.

On May 1997, PRUP implemented a three-year initiative, Abriendo Nuevos Caminos, a youth violence prevention program targeting the North Camden area. Since then, PRUP has been providing direct services to youth residing in Camden City. Through a collaboration agreement with the Board of Education, PRUP was able to teach a violence prevention curriculum at Pyne Poynt and Rafael Cordero Molina schools. The violence prevention curriculum (Initiative, Commitment and Empowerment (ICE), which was specifically developed for this program, continues to be utilized by PRUP. It is based on conflict resolution, self-esteem, communication, understanding violence, anger management, dealing with aggression and cultural awareness. In September 1999, the Juvenile Justice Commission provided PRUP funding for an intensive Youth Leadership Development training. Although our services have been available to all the schools, PRUP has targeted the Pyne Poynt Family School, Rafael Cordero Molina and Cooper’s Poynt School.

Seniors Community Service Employment Program: (June 2003) PRUP, through its affiliate SER National, was awarded a grant to provide low-income seniors in Camden County with transitional training which will lead them to unsubsidized employment. PRUP will be providing services to 146 Camden County low-income seniors.

McKinney-Vento Grant (Homeless Prevention) – In collaboration with the Camden Board of Education, PRUP obtained a contract to assist families in acquiring stable housing, employment and other services needed in order to reduce homelessness while involving the youth in after school activities such as; Computer Literacy, Youth Work Readiness, Violence Prevention, and Arts/crafts.

Welfare to Work is (TANF) Temporary Assistance to Needy Families: This outreach and recruitment program directed towards the TANF participants to outreach and assist 550 clients in fulfilling the Welfare to Work requirements in collaboration with the Camden Empowerment Zone.

Violence Prevention for Youth & Communities: In May 1997, PRUP began a three-year initiative, Abriendo Nuevos Caminos (“Opening New Pathways”), a youth violence prevention program targeting the North Camden area – the City’s most crime ridden neighborhood. Since then, PRUP has been providing direct social intervention services to the young people of Camden City. Through collaborative agreements with the Board of Education, PRUP was able to teach a violence prevention curriculum at Pyne Poynt and Rafael Cordero Molina schools. The violence prevention curriculum (Initiative, Commitment and Empowerment, or ICE), specifically developed for this program, continues to be utilized by PRUP. It is based on enhancing conflict resolution skills, raising self-esteem, improving communication skills (in two languages), understanding violence, anger management, dealing with aggression and promoting cultural awareness.

In September 1999, the NJ Juvenile Justice Commission provided funding for an intensive Youth Leadership Development program. Although our services have been available to all the schools, PRUP has targeted the Pyne Poynt Family School , Rafael Cordero Molina and Cooper’s Poynt School .

The Camden Latino Community Initiative: A Comprehensive School Based Life Skills and Substance Abuse Prevention Program targeting Middle School Latino Girls. During September 2000-2004, PRUP implemented The Camden Latino Initiative. The goals of the program were to significantly reduce the risk for substance abuse, build resiliency through health education and personal skills development utilizing the Botvin Life Skills Training Curriculum. PRUP targeted 1,200 Latinas and fifty were randomly selected to participate in the intervention group while fifty were elected to participate in the control group. The Philadelphia Health Management Corporation conducted the process and outcome evaluation. The three years initiative was successfully completed and all required reporting submitted to CSAP.

Information

Informational workshops are held periodically to keep our client population abreast of those services available to them, changes in services and eligibility guidelines, and their rights and responsibilities as consumers of goods and services. Pamphlets, flyers and brochures are distributed to the general public to reach those who cannot attend workshops.

Founders
Founders

Founders
Freddy Felicano (deceased)
Founders
Jesus Torres (deceased)
Founders
Efrain Blassini
Founders
Hilda Negron
Founders
Jose A. Vazquez
Founders
Ramona Gonzalez
Angel Pena
Graciano Rodriguez
Jose Cabrerra
Angel L. Perez (deceased)
Bienvenido Alvalle
Victor Pena
Conrado Rodriguez
818 S. Broadway
Camden, New Jersey
Phone: 856-541-1418 / 856-541-1429
Fax: 856-541-1476

Contact Information